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Briefcase on constitutional and administrative law

By: Material type: TextTextLanguage: English Publisher: London : Cavendish Publishing, 1995Description: 169 p. ; 22 cmISBN:
  • 1859412475
Subject(s): LOC classification:
  • KD35.G7.1 H47B 1995
Table of contents:
Preface -- Table of cases -- Part 1 Constitutional law -- 1 Conventions distinguished from laws -- 1.1 The nature of constitutional conventions -- 1.2 The distinction between laws and conventions -- 1.3 The courts will admit evidence of conventions to T establish a cause of action -- 1.4 Conventions cannot crystallise into law -- 2 The rule of law -- 2.1 Government according to the law -- 2.2 Equality before the law -- 2.3 Rights are declared by the common law -- 3 Parliament and the courts -- 3.1 The relationship of Parliament and the courts -- 3.2 Privileges of Parliament -- 3.3 Maintaining the constitutional balance between legislature and judicature -- 4 The legislative sovereignty of Parliament -- 4.1 Statute overrides international law -- 4.2 Statute overrides political fact -- 4.3 The courts and the legislative sovereignty of Parliament -- 4.4 Challenge in the courts to derivative legislation -- 4.5 The consequences of membership of the EuropeanT Union for the legislative sovereignty of Parliament -- 5 The prerogative powers of the Crown -- 5.1 Definitions -- 5.2 Prerogative powers conflicting with law -- 5.3 Prerogative powers unauthorised by law -- 5.4 Legal challenge to the exercise of prerogative powers -- 5.5 The relationship between prerogative and statute -- 5.6 Particular prerogative powers -- 5.7 Acts of State -- 6 The Crown and its subjects -- 6.1 Reciprocal duties -- 6.2 The duties of the Crown are not enforceable -- 7 The administration of justice -- 7.1 The characteristics of a court -- 7.2 Judicial immunity for acts done within jurisdiction -- 7.3 Contempt of court -- 7.4 The Attorney General and the enforcement of the law -- 8 The police -- 8.1 The police are servants of the Crown, not of wed local government -- 8.2 The courts and the duty of the police to enforce the law -- 8.3 The police have no general duty to individual members of the public -- Part 2 Administrative law -- 9 Judicial review under Order -- 9.1 The availability of judicial review -- 9.2 Remedies available under Order 53 -- 9.3 Public and private law -- 9.4 Ouster clauses -- 10 Who is subject to judicial review? -- 10.1 The jurisdiction as formerly defined -- 10.2 Recent expansion of the jurisdiction -- 11 The requirement of locus standi -- 1.1 The tests applied at the leave and at the substantive -- stages are not the same -- 11.2 The test for locus standi may vary according to the remedy sought -- 11.3 Recent decisions on locus standi -- 12 The grounds for judicial review: illegality -- 12.1 General definition of illegality -- 12.2 The ultra vires doctrine-- 12.3 The effect of a decision-maker's error of law -- 12.4 Delegation of powers -- 12.5 The exercise of discretion -- 12.6 Relevant and irrelevant considerations -- 12.7 The exercise of discretion for an improper purpose -- 13 The grounds for judicial review: irrationality -- 13.1 General definitions of irrationality -- 13.2 Applications of the principle -- 13.3 The test as applied to decisions approved he by Commons -- 14 The grounds for judicial review: procedural impropriety -- 14.1 General definition of the principle -- 14.2 Express procedural requirements -- 14.3 Natural justice e law -- 14.4 Nemo iudex in causa sua: the role against bias bers -- 15 The doctrine of legitimate expectations -- 15.1 The emergence of the doctrine in English administrative law -- 15.2 Legitimate expectation as a means of establishing locus standi -- 15.3 Legitimate expectation as a means of securing procedural rights -- 15.4 Legitimate expectation as a means of securing substantive rights -- 15.5 Considerations overriding legitimate expectations -- 16 The duty to give reasons -- 16.1 The consequences of failure to give reasons -- 16.2 Circumstances in which the common law imposes a duty to give reasons -- 16.3 Rationales for the imposition of a duty to give reasons -- 17 Proportionality -- 17.1 Explicit discussion of disproportionality as a ground of review -- 17.2 Implicit use of proportionality in judicial reasoning -- Part 3 Civil liberties and the common law -- 18 The European Convention for the Protection of Human Rights and Fundamental Freedoms -- 18.1 The Convention and the UK courts -- 18.2 Common law procedures for the vindication of fundamental rights -- 18.3 The attitude of the European Court of Justice -- 19 Public assembly -- 19.1 Restriction for the avoidance of public disorder -- 20 Public order -- 21 Protection of privacy -- 21.1 Breach of confidence -- 22 Freedom of expression -- 22.1 Compatibility of English law and the Convention -- 23 Freedom of religion -- 23.1 The definition of 'religion' -- 23.2 The extent of the association between Christianity and the law -- 23.3 The law of blasphemy -- 23.4 Religious discrimination and testamentary freedom -- 24 Freedom of movement -- 24.1 Freedom to travel abroad -- 24.2 Exclusion orders: legal challenge -- 24.3 Deportation -- 25 Prisoners' rights -- 25.1 Judicial review is available to vindicate the residual rights of prisoners -- 25.2 Prisoners' rights of access to the courts -- 26 The courts and police powers -- 26.1 Police duties and the nature of the citizen's duty to assist the police -- 26.2 The requirement of legal justification for police action -- 26.3 The exercise of specific powers -- Index.
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Holdings
Item type Current library Collection Call number Copy number Status Date due Barcode Item holds
Law Book Law Book National Assembly Library of Thailand Law Book collection KD 35.G7.1 H47B 1995 (Browse shelf(Opens below)) c. 1 Available 3961135790
Law Book Law Book National Assembly Library of Thailand Law Book collection KD 35.G7.1 H47B 1995 (Browse shelf(Opens below)) c. 2 Available 3961136263
Total holds: 0

Preface --
Table of cases --
Part 1 Constitutional law --
1 Conventions distinguished from laws --
1.1 The nature of constitutional conventions --
1.2 The distinction between laws and conventions --
1.3 The courts will admit evidence of conventions to T establish a cause of action --
1.4 Conventions cannot crystallise into law --
2 The rule of law --
2.1 Government according to the law --
2.2 Equality before the law --
2.3 Rights are declared by the common law --
3 Parliament and the courts --
3.1 The relationship of Parliament and the courts --
3.2 Privileges of Parliament --
3.3 Maintaining the constitutional balance between legislature and judicature --
4 The legislative sovereignty of Parliament --
4.1 Statute overrides international law --
4.2 Statute overrides political fact --
4.3 The courts and the legislative sovereignty of Parliament --
4.4 Challenge in the courts to derivative legislation --
4.5 The consequences of membership of the EuropeanT Union for the legislative sovereignty of Parliament --
5 The prerogative powers of the Crown --
5.1 Definitions --
5.2 Prerogative powers conflicting with law --
5.3 Prerogative powers unauthorised by law --
5.4 Legal challenge to the exercise of prerogative powers --
5.5 The relationship between prerogative and statute --
5.6 Particular prerogative powers --
5.7 Acts of State --
6 The Crown and its subjects --
6.1 Reciprocal duties --
6.2 The duties of the Crown are not enforceable --
7 The administration of justice --
7.1 The characteristics of a court --
7.2 Judicial immunity for acts done within jurisdiction --
7.3 Contempt of court --
7.4 The Attorney General and the enforcement of the law --
8 The police --
8.1 The police are servants of the Crown, not of wed local government --
8.2 The courts and the duty of the police to enforce the law --
8.3 The police have no general duty to individual members of the public --
Part 2 Administrative law --
9 Judicial review under Order --
9.1 The availability of judicial review --
9.2 Remedies available under Order 53 --
9.3 Public and private law --
9.4 Ouster clauses --
10 Who is subject to judicial review? --
10.1 The jurisdiction as formerly defined --
10.2 Recent expansion of the jurisdiction --
11 The requirement of locus standi --
1.1 The tests applied at the leave and at the substantive --
stages are not the same --
11.2 The test for locus standi may vary according to the remedy sought --
11.3 Recent decisions on locus standi --
12 The grounds for judicial review: illegality --
12.1 General definition of illegality --
12.2 The ultra vires doctrine--
12.3 The effect of a decision-maker's error of law --
12.4 Delegation of powers --
12.5 The exercise of discretion --
12.6 Relevant and irrelevant considerations --
12.7 The exercise of discretion for an improper purpose --
13 The grounds for judicial review: irrationality --
13.1 General definitions of irrationality --
13.2 Applications of the principle --
13.3 The test as applied to decisions approved he by Commons --
14 The grounds for judicial review: procedural impropriety --
14.1 General definition of the principle --
14.2 Express procedural requirements --
14.3 Natural justice e law --
14.4 Nemo iudex in causa sua: the role against bias bers --
15 The doctrine of legitimate expectations --
15.1 The emergence of the doctrine in English administrative law --
15.2 Legitimate expectation as a means of establishing locus standi --
15.3 Legitimate expectation as a means of securing procedural rights --
15.4 Legitimate expectation as a means of securing substantive rights --
15.5 Considerations overriding legitimate expectations --
16 The duty to give reasons --
16.1 The consequences of failure to give reasons --
16.2 Circumstances in which the common law imposes a duty to give reasons --
16.3 Rationales for the imposition of a duty to give reasons --
17 Proportionality --
17.1 Explicit discussion of disproportionality as a ground of review --
17.2 Implicit use of proportionality in judicial reasoning --
Part 3 Civil liberties and the common law --
18 The European Convention for the Protection of Human Rights and Fundamental Freedoms --
18.1 The Convention and the UK courts --
18.2 Common law procedures for the vindication of fundamental rights --
18.3 The attitude of the European Court of Justice --
19 Public assembly --
19.1 Restriction for the avoidance of public disorder --
20 Public order --
21 Protection of privacy --
21.1 Breach of confidence --
22 Freedom of expression --
22.1 Compatibility of English law and the Convention --
23 Freedom of religion --
23.1 The definition of 'religion' --
23.2 The extent of the association between Christianity and the law --
23.3 The law of blasphemy --
23.4 Religious discrimination and testamentary freedom --
24 Freedom of movement --
24.1 Freedom to travel abroad --
24.2 Exclusion orders: legal challenge --
24.3 Deportation --
25 Prisoners' rights --
25.1 Judicial review is available to vindicate the residual rights of prisoners --
25.2 Prisoners' rights of access to the courts --
26 The courts and police powers --
26.1 Police duties and the nature of the citizen's duty to assist the police --
26.2 The requirement of legal justification for police action --
26.3 The exercise of specific powers --
Index.

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